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“The Capture of Tenochtitlán” from Exploring the Early Americas

“The Capture of Tenochtitlán” from Exploring the Early Americas

Thomas Jefferson Building has reopened to visitors via timed, ticketed entry. More

Visit the Library of Congress and experience the world’s largest collection of culture and creativity like never before. The Thomas Jefferson Building features exhibitions and installations that bring the Library’s unparalleled collections to life. Whether you are in Washington, D.C., or at home, let the Library of Congress take you on a unique and personal journey through history and culture. Millions of items are waiting for you—explore, discover, and be inspired.

Rosa Parks: In Her Own Words

South Gallery, Second Floor, Thomas Jefferson Building
Opened December 5, 2019

Showcases rarely seen materials that offer an intimate view of Rosa Parks and documents her life and activism—creating a rich opportunity for viewers to discover new dimensions to their understanding of this seminal figure. The materials are drawn extensively from the Rosa Parks Collection, a gift to the Library of Congress from the Howard G. Buffett Foundation.

Shall Not Be Denied: Women Fight for the Vote

Southwest Gallery, Second Floor, Thomas Jefferson Building
June 4, 2019–September 2020

Tells the story of the seventy-two-year campaign for women’s suffrage. Considered the largest reform movement in American history, its participants believed that securing the vote was essential to achieving women’s economic, social, and political equality. For years, determined women organized, lobbied, paraded, petitioned, lectured, picketed, and faced imprisonment. Their collective story is one of courage, perseverance, savvy, creativity, and hope that continues to inspire activists today.

Mapping a Growing Nation: From Independence to Statehood

North Gallery, First Floor, Thomas Jefferson Building
September 1, 2016–Ongoing

Abel Buell’s New and Correct Map of the United States of North America is the first map of the newly independent United States compiled, printed, and published in America by an American. This important early American map is known to exist in only seven copies. Philanthropist David M. Rubenstein has generously placed his copy of the map at the Library.

Thomas Jefferson's Library

Southwest Pavilion, Second Floor, Thomas Jefferson Building
April 11, 2008–Ongoing

Take a trip through a re-created version of Jefferson’s library, which assembles 6,487 volumes that founded the Library of Congress, and learn how one of America’s greatest thinkers was inspired through the world of books.

Exploring the Early Americas

Northwest Gallery, Second Floor, Thomas Jefferson Building
December 12, 2007–Ongoing

Examine indigenous cultures, the drama of the encounters between Native Americans and Europeans, and the resulting changes caused by the meeting of the two worlds, which features selections from the Jay I. Kislak Collection. This exhibit also features Martin Waldseemüller’s 1507 map of the world—the first on which the word “America” appears.